Pear-Shaped Puffball Mushrooms

I was excited to see a new mushroom so we picked them to save in case we found out later they were edible. They are indeed edible, but... make sure you eat them fast.  We kept our overnight in a paper bag and they went to spore but the next morning.
Self-healing mushroom grain jar caps

What are Pear-Shaped Puffball

My wife spotted a few of these for the first time at Linn Run State Park.  I was excited to see a new mushroom so we picked them to save in case we found out later they were edible. They are indeed edible, but… make sure you eat them fast.  We kept our overnight in a paper bag and they went to spore but the next morning.

Once they go to spore, they aren’t palatable. From what I understand they are super bitter.

Lycoperdon Pyriforme

AKA: Gem Studded Puffballs, Pear-Shaped Puffball Mushrooms

Mushroom Growing Naming Convention

As I continue to ramp up my mushroom growing endeavors, I am finding that I need to take better notes on my batches from the creation of the substrate to the inoculation and grow room.  To help with this, I am coming up with a naming convention for my grow outs and thought I would share it with everyone.

7 Amazing Wild Mushrooms in PA

Boletus Edulis - King Bolet

Boletus edulis. Called “king bolete,” these have a thick stalk and a nut-like cap. They are found near the roots of trees.

 

Laetiporus sulphureus. Called “chicken of the woods,” this fungus grows as a parasite on dead wood. The creamy yellow/orange mushroom forms a cascading series of shelves resembling a lava flow, and yes, it tastes like chicken.

 

shaggy mane

Coprinus comatus. Known as “shaggy mane,” these are abundant in the fall. They have a large cap that looks somewhat like an artillery shell. These should be eaten shortly after picking or the cap will deteriorate into a gooey mass. This mushroom is found in grassy fields.

 

Giant Puffball

Langermannia gigantea. Known to kids far and wide as a “giant puffball,” this fungus must be eaten fresh, when its flesh is white. They are found in fields.

 

horn of plenty mushroom

Craterellus cornucopiodes. The “horn of plenty” is black and looks rather unappetizing, but its trumpet-like shape is recognizable, and the mushroom is quite tasty.

 

Oyster Mushrooms in the Spring

Pleurotus ostreatus. Called “oyster mushrooms,” these fungi look fragile and flare from the stem. They have a slightly meaty taste.

Oyster Mushrooms in the Spring

Cantharellus. Chanterelle Mushrooms are beautiful orange mushrooms with a white inside. These are a choice mushroom.

Morel Mushroom

Morechella esculenta. The morel, which resembles a pine cone or Christmas tree-shaped sponge on a stalk, is commonly found in the spring in wooded areas.

Laetiporus Sulphureus – Chicken of the Woods

Chicken of the Woods is an awesome mushroom that has the texture of chicken and can really take on the flavor of the dish you are preparing.

Easy to Make Mushroom Grain Jar Caps

It’s super easy to make your own Mushroom Grain Jar caps with self-healing injection ports. Here is how!

How to Make: Lapin à la Moutarde

Lapin à la Moutarde is French. I made this and it’s rich and intoxicating and layered in flavor. I enjoyed my time reading about the dish and then actually preparing it. You can use the whole rabbit for this dish, I look forward to preparing it again.

~ Laurie Luther @lutherhomestead.com

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